Stop! In the name of Octagons!

March 29th, 2014 by munizao Leave a reply »

In the spirit of the flexible rhombic cell polyominoes that I posted about previously, here’s a hexiamond tiling of eight triangular segments squashed into an octagon:

hexiamonds in an octagon

Of course, octagons can also be used as base cells for polyforms. In fact, any regular polygon (and quite a lot of other things) can be used in this way, but octagons are special. They don’t tessellate the plane by themselves like equilateral triangles, squares, and hexagons, but they do form a semi-regular tessellation of the plane along with squares. This makes polyocts behave fairly well; you won’t be able to tile something convex and hole-free with them, but you can tile something that’s reasonably symmetrical at least. For example, here’s a tiling of the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-octs:

polyocts-2

That’s not the most symmetry that polyocts are capable of, (full octagonal symmetry is possible) but it’s the most we’re going to get with this set of pieces. See this page by George Sicherman for some figures with full symmetry that can be tiled with various individual polyocts.

Leave a Reply