Posts Tagged ‘tilings’

Tiling tilted tori

November 15th, 2016

A friend of mine recently complained about not being able to tile anything nice with the full set of polyominoes of size 1 though 5. (No, I didn’t make that up! I have weird friends. Who are not made up.) The area of these pieces is 89, which is prime. So our usual tactic of making a rectangle using divisors of the area won’t work.

But there is in fact something highly symmetrical that these pieces can tile. And its existence follows from the fact that while 89 may not be composite, it is the sum of two squares. 89 = 25 + 64 = 52 + 82.

Taking the sum of two squares may remind you of the Pythagorean Theorem, and that is exactly where I was headed. Make a right triangle where the legs have length 5 and 8, and the hypotenuse will have a length of sqrt(89). And then, naturally, if you make a square out of four sides with that length, it will have an area of 89:
area-89-square

So I have something that indeed has the desired area, but you might complain that having sides that slice obliquely to the square grid makes it entirely unsuitable for tiling with a set of polyominoes. But suppose we stitched the pairs of opposite sides together. That would turn the figure into a torus, which “unwraps” into a repeated, plane-filling pattern:
1-5-ominoes-torus
Which we can tile! If fact, tori are generally relatively easy to tile because they have no edges, and the edge is typically the hardest part of a pattern to tile. Having small pieces in the mix, as we do here, also tends to make tiling easier. So for a challenge, we could try something harder.

Problem #44:

Find a a tiling of the torus above with the 1–5-ominoes where none of the pieces of size 4 or smaller are adjacent to each other. Touching at corners is okay, but if you can find a solution without that, that’s even better. (Weird, it’s been three years since I’ve posed a numbered problem on this blog.)

This problem runs into a wall in my current setup for solving polyform tiling problems. I typically add ugly hacks to my copy of David Googer’s Polyform Puzzler. It’s reasonably handy because it’s open source and written in my language of choice, Python. But it doesn’t include a hook for pruning the search tree when you come to a configuration that doesn’t meet a desired condition. For problems with a small enough search space this doesn’t matter; you can just filter finished solutions as long as the time needed to run a complete search is reasonable. But here the high tilability is actually a curse: the solver starts in an area of the search space where the adjacency condition isn’t met, and because the pieces are so numerous and so tilable, it can stay there for an extremely long time before it decides to change out any of the tiles placed early on. (There are technical reasons why hacking in the hook I would need appears to be difficult, but I won’t get into those here.)

Coincidentally, the area of the 1–4-ominoes, 29, is also a sum of squares:
1-4-ominoes-torus
Any parallelogram can be used as the fundamental domain of a torus. Rectangle and rhombus shaped fundamental domains can have just as much symmetry as a tilted square. (Because the square is tilted, flipping it over isn’t a valid symmetry action, though rotating it still is.) But the tilted square tori still strike me as particularly pleasing and unexpected patterns for tiling.

Constellations

August 22nd, 2013

I made a presentation on flexible polyforms at the last Gathering for Gardner, but there were some polyform types that I didn’t get to, since I hadn’t yet come up with any good problems for them. One odd sort of polyform, which I am fancifully calling a constellation, can be obtained from configurations of points on the plane. We can consider two sets of points on the plane to be distinct if the pattern of collinearity among the points is different. Because every pair of points defines a line, the lines with only two points are, in a sense, not interesting; only the lines with three or more points need to be considered when determining whether two constellations differ. It seems reasonable to consider the order of points on a line to be significant; this gives us three different 5-point constellations with a pair of three point lines that meet at a point. There are 7 5-point constellations in all. Here’s the first tiling puzzle solution I found for them:

constellation-5-5

One rule for constellation tiling puzzles that I like is to disallow any point from one constellation from falling directly between two points in another constellation. This keeps the constellations more compact, and adds a little challenge to the puzzle. I like to get as much symmetry as possible in one of these flexible polyform tilings, so I decided to try for one with 7-fold symmetry. This was a little harder, but eventually I found the following tiling:

constellation-5-7

Where can we go from here? If I’ve counted right, there are 21 6-constellations. Of these, 7 can be formed by adding one independent point (a point on no line of 3) to each of the 5-constellations. The full set seems a little too big to solve by hand, but if we exclude the ones with independent points, a puzzle with the remaining 14 seems more manageable. (We may also want to exclude the 6-constellation with two separate lines of three points. With that one excluded, the remaining 13 6-constellations all can be formed from connected groups of lines with 3 or more points.)
constellation-6-set

The 14 6-constellations with no independent points.

Problem #42: Find a tiling of 6-constellations with 6-fold dihedral symmetry. Either the set of 13 or the set of 14 will do. Even more symmetry is even better.

3.8.24

May 27th, 2013

A regular 24-gon, octagon, and triangle together form one of the 17 ways (called vertex figures) to surround a vertex with regular polygons. This vertex figure can’t do anything nice like tile the plane. You can surround the 24-gon with octagons and triangles, but then you have gaps that can’t be filled with regular polygons, and you have to stop.

24-8-3-rose

Or, instead of stopping, you could take that 24-gon surrounded by octagons and triangles, and surround it with 12 more 24-gons surrounded by octagons and triangles, overlapping in an elegant sort of way:

24-8-3-doodle

And then, instead of stopping there, you could surround that whole thing with more copies of that whole thing…

But sometimes art is where you stop.

Hat tip to John Baez, who brought up the 3.7.42 vertex figure in a Google+ post.