Archive for February, 2017

Pentominoes on paths and trees

February 3rd, 2017

Here’s a path that could be taken by a chess king. All subpaths of length four describe a different pentomino:

A pentomino train

This led from the grid of pentomino painting instructions that I posted previously. Consider a string of arrows for which the subsequences of length 4 include instructions for producing all 12 pentominoes. (This is somewhat analogous to a de Bruijn sequence.) For the case shown, the string is ←↑↖→→→→↓↓←↓←↘↗↓, although the graphic seems more illuminating than the arrow string here.

Instead of a path, we could have a tree of pentominoes:

Along with the constraints that each pentomino occurs exactly once, and no square is used more than once, I wanted to limit the number of branches per node. The root node having three branches might be considered a flaw, but this was the best I could do.

Pentomino Painting Robots

February 1st, 2017

In the diagram below, each row (reading from left to right) and column (reading from top to bottom) gives instructions for painting one of the 12 pentominoes:

Sometimes an idea languishes in one of my notebooks for a few years before I can come up with the right iteration of it. My original idea here was to use a 4×4 grid. That would give me 8 pentominoes, (perhaps 10 using diagonals) but elegance surely requires all 12 to be present.

A combination of circumstances led me back to this problem. Some friends of mine have a tradition of playing RoboRally on New Year’s Day every year. This is a board game where you use cards with arrows on them to instruct your robot to move around a grid of squares. Also, in returning to the magic 45-omino problem, I was considering grids that could be used in sparse magic squares.

It might be possible to make an interesting grid puzzle, along the lines of sudoku, using this kind of grid as a basis. Most of the grid would start empty, except for a few squares in which arrows would be given at the start. Then the solver would fill in the rest of the grid by logical deduction so that the horizontal and vertical lines contain instructions for paining all of the pentominoes as above. Since the grid would have significantly fewer squares than a sudoku, this puzzle might be quicker to solve, but that doesn’t mean that it would necessarily be less interesting.